Solar System

1. Solar Array
2. Conduit
3. Inverter
4. Net Meter

Solar System

1. Solar Array

A canopy elevates solar arrays 9 feet above the roof surface, over obstructions, fire paths, shade and amenities.

A tilt rack splits solar arrays into separate sections that are installed around obstructions and fire paths.

4. Net Meter

Net Meter

As a solar owner you remain connected to the grid. When you produce extra electricity during the day that you don’t consume, the excess is sent to the grid and you receive credit for it on your monthly Con Ed bill.

This credit balances against the electricity that you consume during the evening when your solar system is not producing energy. This arrangement, called net metering, is enabled by a special two-way meter that keeps track of how much energy you import and export in real time.

3. Inverter

Inverter

The inverter converts Direct Current (DC) electricity generated by solar panels into Alternating Current (AC), which is compatible with the grid and all household devices and appliances. The inverter ties into the main circuit breaker panel, injecting AC power into the home’s electrical distribution for direct consumption.

The inverter is also “the brain” of the solar system, logging and reporting performance data to BSW via the internet throughout the day. If a system is not functioning properly, the inverter lets us know.

2. Conduit

Conduit

The solar panels’ wiring is combined and linked to the electrical service area in the basement via a ¾” aluminum conduit run.

To limit visibility the run extends down the back of the home, through the foundation wall, and along the ceiling of the basement to the electrical service area in the front of the home.

Running conduit in the shortest distance, across multiple floors with the least amount of disruption possible is an artform that BSW has mastered better than anyone.

Components